Famous Music Venues Around the UK

Nowhere in the world has musical heritage quite like the UK does. From the Beatles and Bowie to Adele and Clean Bandit, we’ve a well-established knack for creating music megastars over the last seven decades. 

Of course, every superstar has to start somewhere. Legendary artists mean legendary venues, and the UK is home to plenty. Naturally, not all have survived since their heyday, when they intimately hosted the very acts that would go on to shape music history – but thankfully plenty remain intact. Here are six iconic music venues you can’t afford to miss. 

The Cavern Club, Liverpool
Where else to start than Liverpool’s iconic Cavern Club? Opened in 1957 by Alan Sytner, originally as a Parisian-style jazz club, it wasn’t long before the venue became the beating heart of Liverpool’s burgeoning rock n roll scene. On 9th February 1961, a then-little-known band The Beatles took to the stage for the first time. Nine months and several performances later, they’d be spotted at the club by music manager Brian Epstein – and the rest is history. 

Despite being demolished in 1973, the Cavern was too iconic to leave dead. It was resurrected 11 years later using many of the building’s original bricks. You can still visit the club today and have your photograph taken on the stage, though if you’re lucky, you might even catch a gig. 

If you’re looking for somewhere to stay on your Liverpool city break, ibis Styles Liverpool Centre Dale Street is perfectly located, just four minutes’ walk from the club. 
100 Club, London
Just like the Cavern, this iconic venue can trace its origins to the jazz movement, but it’s the club’s involvement in the emergence of punk that really put it on the map. In September 1976, 100 played host to an ‘international punk festival’, during which bands including The Sex Pistols, The Clash, Buzzcocks, The Jam and The Stranglers would take to the stage. And while it continued its regular jazz nights, the Club had secured its place in punk history.  

Nestled beneath shops on London’s Oxford Street, its presence has come under threat more than once, but 100 Club has hung on in there. Head down and check out the 350-capacity venue’s décor, which has hardly changed since the 70s. 
King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Glasgow
You need only speak to the patrons of King Tut’s to get an idea of how special this small venue really is. First opened in 1990, the 300-capacity space quickly gained traction as the place in Scotland to catch live acts that were on the cusp of something big. This was confirmed in 1993, when The Verve, Radiohead and Oasis all played the venue in just a two-week period. In fact, it’s where the latter were first spotted by their would-be record label. 

Still every bit as busy as it was then, you can catch a live act down at King Tut’s most nights of the week, so swing by and see what you find. If you’re looking for a hotel in Glasgow that’s nearby, ibis Glasgow City Centre Sauchiehall Street is just around the corner. 
O2 arena, London
Though not a classic, in its relatively brief history the O2 Arena has firmly cemented its position as the world’s leading music venue. In fact, it’s been the most visited on the planet since 2015. That’s why it’s the go-to for the industry’s goliaths, hosting big-budget tours and spectacular sports events several nights every week.  
 
If you’re considering a trip to the capital, check the arena’s website before you book. You might just be able to arrange your city break around seeing your favourite act take to the stage. If you’re looking for a London hotel, ibis London Docklands Canary Wharf is just a hop across the water. 
Band on the Wall, Manchester
Where else to start than Liverpool’s iconic Cavern Club? Opened in 1957 by Alan Sytner, originally as a Parisian-style jazz club, it wasn’t long before the venue became the beating heart of Liverpool’s burgeoning rock n roll scene. On 9th February 1961, a then-little-known band The Beatles took to the stage for the first time. Nine months and several performances later, they’d be spotted at the club by music manager Brian Epstein – and the rest is history. 

Despite being demolished in 1973, the Cavern was too iconic to leave dead. It was resurrected 11 years later using many of the building’s original bricks. You can still visit the club today and have your photograph taken on the stage, though if you’re lucky, you might even catch a gig. 

If you’re looking for somewhere to stay on your Liverpool city break, ibis Styles Liverpool Centre Dale Street is perfectly located, just four minutes’ walk from the club. 
The Leadmill, Sheffield
Once the stomping ground of an early Pulp and Arctic Monkeys, Sheffield’s longest running music venue has plenty to shout about. Once described as a ‘rite of passage’ by Franz Ferdinand, this historic venue is as famous for its great crowd as it is for the acts that have taken to its stage – including The Cult, Suede, Manic Street Preachers, Muse, Oasis, The White Stripes and The Stone Roses, amongst others.  
 
There’s always something going on at The Leadmill – be it a gig or club night – so be sure to check it out next time you’re in town. If you’re looking for a hotel nearby, ibis Sheffield City is just a 12-minute walk up the road.  
 
 
Getting exploring some of Britain’s best live music venues, when you book your next city break with ibis. 
 
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